1887

Abstract

Microbial biofilms are ubiquitous in drinking water systems, yet our understanding of drinking water biofilms lags behind our understanding of those in other environments. Here, a six-member model bacterial community was used to identify the interactions and individual contributions of each species to community biofilm formation. These bacteria were isolated from the International Space Station potable water system and include , , , ( and , but all six species are common members of terrestrial potable water systems. Using reconstituted assemblages, from pairs to all 6 members, community biofilm formation was observed to be robust to the absence of any single species and only removal of the / pair, out of all 15 possible 2-species subtractions, led to loss of community biofilm formation. In conjunction with these findings, dual-species biofilm formation assays supported the view that the contribution of to community biofilm formation was dependent on synergistic biofilm formation with either or . These data support a model of multiple, partially redundant species interactions to generate robustness in biofilm formation. A bacteriophage and multiple predatory bacteria were used to test the resilience of the community to the removal of individual members , but the combination of precise and substantial depletion of a single target species was not achievable. We propose that this assemblage can be used as a tractable model to understand the molecular bases of the interactions described here and to decipher other functions of drinking water biofilms.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000849
2019-10-04
2019-10-19
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