1887

Abstract

Small non-coding sRNAs have versatile roles in regulating bacterial metabolism. Four short homologous sRNAs strongly expressed under conditions of growth arrest were recently identified. Here we report the detailed investigation of one of these, NcS27. sRNA NcS27 contains a short putative target recognition sequence, which is conserved throughout the order . This sequence is the reverse complement of the Shine–Dalgarno sequence of a large number of genes involved in transport and metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates. Overexpression of NcS27 sRNA had a distinct impact on growth, attenuating growth on a variety of substrates such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, glycerol and galactose, while having no effect on growth on other substrates. Transcriptomics and proteomics of NcS27 overexpression and silencing mutants revealed numerous predicted targets changing expression, notably of genes involved in degradation of aromatic amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine, and in transport of carbohydrates. The conserved target recognition sequence was essential for growth phenotypes and gene expression changes. Cumulatively, our data point to a role of NcS27 in regulating the shutdown of metabolism upon nutrient deprivation in . We propose ouble-airpin sRNA regulator as designation for .

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000848
2019-10-01
2019-10-15
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