1887

Abstract

Gram-positive Actinobacteria from the genus Streptomyces are best known for their morphological complexity and for their ability to produce numerous bioactive specialized metabolites with useful applications in human and veterinary medicine and in agriculture. In contrast, the ability to infect living plant tissues and to cause diseases of root and tuber crops such as potato common scab (CS) is a rare attribute among members of this genus. Research on the virulence mechanisms of plant-pathogenic Streptomyces spp. has revealed the importance of the thaxtomin phytotoxins as key pathogenicity determinants produced by several species. In addition, other phytotoxic specialized metabolites may contribute to the development or severity of disease caused by Streptomyces spp., along with the production of phytohormones and secreted proteins. A thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant pathogenicity will enable the development of better management procedures for controlling CS and other plant diseases caused by the Streptomyces .

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2019-06-04
2019-09-24
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