1887

Abstract

species are symbionts of entomopathogenic nematodes and pathogens of susceptible insects. Nematodes enter insect hosts and perforate the midgut to invade the haemocoel where bacteria are released transitioning to their pathogenic stage. During nematode invasion microbes from the insect gut translocate into the haemocoel. Different species of nematodes carrying specific strains of can also invade the same insect. species thereby compete for nutrients and space with both related strains and non-related gut microbes. While species produce diverse antimicrobial compounds in complex media, their functions in insect hosts are not well understood. We show that produced -dependent antibiotics that were active against both gut-derived microbes and whereas antibiotics of were not active against growth was inhibited in co-cultures with wild-type in medium that mimics insect haemolymph. An antibiotic-deficient strain of was created by inactivating the gene that encodes the enzyme that attaches the 4′ phosphopantetheinyl moiety to non-ribosomal peptide synthetases involved in antibiotic biosynthesis. growth was not inhibited in co-cultures with the strain. The growth of was suppressed in co-injected with wild-type and In contrast, growth of was not suppressed in co-injected with the strain. Two unique compounds were detected by MALDI-TOF MS analysis in haemolymph infected with the wild-type but not with the strain. Finally, killing of was delayed in insects infected with the strain. These findings indicate that in the insect host produces -dependent products involved in both interspecies competition and virulence.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000793
2019-05-01
2019-12-15
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