1887

Abstract

Histaminol is a relatively rare metabolite most commonly resulting from histidine metabolism. Here we describe histaminol production and secretion into the culture broth by the methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis S2 as well as a number of other methanogens. This work is the first identification of this compound as a natural product in methanogens. Its biosynthesis from histidine was confirmed by the incorporation of H3-histidine into histaminol by growing cells of M. maripaludis S2. Possible functions of this molecule could be cell signaling as observed with histamine in eukaryotes or uptake of metal ions.

Keyword(s): Histaminol , methanogens and siderophores
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2019-02-04
2020-12-01
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