1887

Abstract

The synthesis of methionine is critical for most bacteria. It is known that cellular methionine has a feedback effect on the expression of met genes involved in de novo methionine biosynthesis. Previous studies revealed that Gram-negative bacteria control met gene expression at the transcriptional level by regulator proteins, while most Gram-positive bacteria regulate met genes at post-transcriptional level by RNA regulators (riboregulators) located in the 5′UTR of met genes. However, despite its importance, the methionine biosynthesis pathway in the Gram-negative Xanthomonas genus that includes many important plant pathogens is completely uncharacterized. Here, we address this issue using the crucifer black rot pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), a model bacterium in microbe–plant interaction studies. The work identified an operon (met) involved in de novo methionine biosynthesis in Xcc. Disruption of the operon resulted in defective growth in methionine-limited media and in planta. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of the operon is dependent on methionine levels. Further molecular analyses demonstrated that the 5′UTR, but not the promoter of the operon, is involved in feedback regulation on operon expression in response to methionine availability, providing an example of a Gram-negative bacterium utilizing a 5′UTR region to control the expression of the genes involved in methionine biosynthesis.

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2018-07-19
2019-10-20
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