1887

Abstract

The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) comprises a group of 24 species, many of which are opportunistic pathogens of immunocompromised patients and also are widely distributed in agricultural soils. Several Bcc strains synthesize strain-specific antagonistic compounds. In this study, the broad killing activity of B. cenocepacia TAtl-371, a Bcc strain isolated from the tomato rhizosphere, was characterized. This strain exhibits a remarkable antagonism against bacteria, yeast and fungi including other Bcc strains, multidrug-resistant human pathogens and plant pathogens. Genome analysis of strain TAtl-371 revealed several genes involved in the production of antagonistic compounds: siderophores, bacteriocins and hydrolytic enzymes. In pursuit of these activities, we observed growth inhibition of Candida glabrata and Paraburkholderia phenazinium that was dependent on the iron concentration in the medium, suggesting the involvement of siderophores. This strain also produces a previously described lectin-like bacteriocin (LlpA88) and here this was shown to inhibit only Bcc strains but no other bacteria. Moreover, a compound with an m/z 391.2845 with antagonistic activity against Tatumella terrea SHS 2008 was isolated from the TAtl-371 culture supernatant. This strain also contains a phage-tail-like bacteriocin (tailocin) and two chitinases, but the activity of these compounds was not detected. Nevertheless, the previous activities are not responsible for the whole antimicrobial spectrum of TAtl-371 seen on agar plates, suggesting the presence of other compounds yet to be found. In summary, we observed a diversified antimicrobial activity for strain TAtl-371 and believe it supports the biotechnological potential of this Bcc strain as a source of new antimicrobials.

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2018-07-20
2022-05-23
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