1887

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the characteristics of the Helicobacter pylori host NY43 strain and its prophage-cured derivative. H. pylori colonizing the human stomach cause many diseases. They show high genetic diversity, allowing the development of mutant strains that can form bacterial communities adapted to specific environmental conditions. Bacteriophage activities are associated with bacterial evolution, including pathogenicity development. Herein, we reported the complete genome sequence and genomic organization of two H. pylori prophages, KHP30 and KHP40; the effects of KHP30 on the behaviours of NY43 are not yet known. We showed that approximately 57 % prophage-cured derivatives spontaneously appeared in the exponential phase during liquid culture, and the biological characteristics of these derivatives differed from those of the host NY43. KHP30 reinfected the cured derivatives, and the curing ratio was influenced by culture conditions. KHP30 was shown to promote the development of a flexible H. pylori community with variable characteristics.

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2018-05-08
2019-10-15
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