1887

Abstract

Aspergillus fumigatus is a saprotrophic fungus that continuously disseminates spores (conidia) into the environment. It is also the most common and opportunistic aerial fungal pathogen, causing allergic and chronic lung pathologies including the fatal invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. The pathobiology of aspergillosis is complex and depends on the competence of the host immune system. Moreover, A. fumigatus has become a model to study unique features of fungi. This includes the fungal cell wall, which not only acts as a rigid skeleton for protection against hostile environments but also plays significant roles during infection by manipulating the host immune response.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000651
2018-08-01
2019-09-24
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/164/8/1009.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000651&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. O'Gorman CM, Fuller H, Dyer PS. Discovery of a sexual cycle in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Nature 2009;457:471–474 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Nierman WC, Pain A, Anderson MJ, Wortman JR, Kim HS et al. Genomic sequence of the pathogenic and allergenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. Nature 2005;438:1151–1156 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Fedorova ND, Khaldi N, Joardar VS, Maiti R, Amedeo P et al. Genomic islands in the pathogenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. PLoS Genet 2008;4:e1000046 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Miao Y, Liu D, Li G, Li P, Xu Y et al. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of a superior biomass-degrading strain of A. fumigatus revealed active lignocellulose-degrading genes. BMC Genomics 2015;16:459 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Tekaia F, Latgé JP. Aspergillus fumigatus: saprophyte or pathogen?. Curr Opin Microbiol 2005;8:385–392 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Lamoth F. Aspergillus fumigatus-related species in clinical practice. Front Microbiol 2016;7:683 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Seyedmousavi S, Guillot J, Arné P, de Hoog GS, Mouton JW et al. Aspergillus and aspergilloses in wild and domestic animals: a global health concern with parallels to human disease. Med Mycol 2015;53:765–797 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Brown GD, Denning DW, Gow NA, Levitz SM, Netea MG et al. Hidden killers: human fungal infections. Sci Transl Med 2012;4:165rv13 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. de Vries RP, Visser J. Aspergillus enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 2001;65:497–522 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Akoumianaki T, Kyrmizi I, Valsecchi I, Gresnigt MS, Samonis G et al. Aspergillus cell wall melanin blocks LC3-associated phagocytosis to promote pathogenicity. Cell Host Microbe 2016;19:79–90 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Fontaine T, Delangle A, Simenel C, Coddeville B, van Vliet SJ et al. Galactosaminogalactan, a new immunosuppressive polysaccharide of Aspergillus fumigatus. PLoS Pathog 2011;7:e1002372 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Ben-Ami R, Lewis RE, Leventakos K, Kontoyiannis DP. Aspergillus fumigatus inhibits angiogenesis through the production of gliotoxin and other secondary metabolites. Blood 2009;114:5393–5399 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. van de Veerdonk FL, Gresnigt MS, Romani L, Netea MG, Latgé JP. Aspergillus fumigatus morphology and dynamic host interactions. Nat Rev Microbiol 2017;15:661–674 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000651
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error