1887

Abstract

Carbonic anhydrase (CA) EcaA of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 was previously characterized as a putative extracellular α-class CA, however, its activity was never verified. Here we show that EcaA possesses specific CA activity, which is inhibited by ethoxyzolamide. An active EcaA was expressed in heterologous bacterial system, which supports the formation of disulfide bonds, as a full-length protein (EcaA+L) and as a mature protein that lacks a leader peptide (EcaA-L). EcaA-L exhibited higher specific activity compared to EcaA+L. The recombinant EcaA, expressed in a bacterial system that does not support optimal disulfide bond formation, exhibited extremely low activity. This activity, however, could be enhanced by the thiol-oxidizing agent, diamide; while a disulfide bond-reducing agent, dithiothreitol, further inactivated the enzyme. Intact E. coli cells that overexpress EcaA+L possess a small amount of processed protein, EcaA-L, whereas the bulk of the full-length protein resides in the cytosol. This may indicate poor recognition of the EcaA leader peptide by protein export systems. S. elongatus possessed a relatively low level of ecaA mRNA, which varied insignificantly in response to changes in CO2 supply. However, the presence of protein in the cells is not obvious. This points to the physiological insignificance of EcaA in S. elongatus, at least under the applied experimental conditions.

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2018-02-27
2019-10-23
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