1887

Abstract

S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) is an essential metabolite, playing a wide variety of metabolic roles. The enzyme that produces AdoMet from l-methionine and ATP (methionine adenosyltransferase, MAT) is thus an attractive target for anti-cancer and antimicrobial agents. It would be very useful to have a system that allows rapid identification of species-specific inhibitors of this essential enzyme. A previously generated E. coli strain, lacking MAT (∆metK) but containing a heterologous AdoMet transporter, was successfully complemented with heterologous metK genes from several bacterial pathogens, as well as with MAT genes from a fungal pathogen and Homo sapiens. The nine tested genes, which vary in both sequence and kinetic properties, all complemented strain MOB1490 well in rich medium. When these strains were grown in glucose minimal medium, growth delays or defects were observed with some specific metK genes, defects that were dramatically reduced if l-methionine was added to the medium.

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2017-11-07
2019-10-14
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