1887

Abstract

Acinetobacter baumannii is a ubiquitous multidrug-resistant bacteria that is found on a variety of surfaces, including skin, hair and soil. During the past decade, A. baumannii has emerged as a significant cause of nosocomial infections in the United States. Recent studies have highlighted the ability of some bacteria to utilize a wide variety of fatty acids as a membrane remodelling strategy. Considering this, we hypothesized that fatty acids may have an effect on the emerging pathogen A. baumannii. Thin-layer chromatography indicated structural alterations to major phospholipids. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry confirmed the assimilation of numerous exogenous polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) into the phospholipid species of A. baumannii. The incorporation of fatty acids affected several bacterial phenotypes, including membrane permeability, biofilm formation, surface motility and antimicrobial peptide resistance.

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2017-10-23
2019-10-19
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