1887

Abstract

Small bacteriophage-like particles called gene transfer agents (GTAs) that mediate DNA transfer between cells are produced by a variety of prokaryotes. The model GTA, produced by the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA), is controlled by several cellular regulators, and production is induced upon entry into the stationary phase. We report that RcGTA production and gene transfer are stimulated by nutrient depletion. Cells depleted of organic carbon or blocked for amino acid biosynthesis increased RcGTA production and release from cells. Furthermore, cells lacking the sole RelA-SpoT homologue produced decreased levels of RcGTA, and the RNA polymerase omega (ω) subunit was required for appreciable production of RcGTA.

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2017-09-04
2019-10-20
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