1887

Abstract

The ggpS gene, which encodes the key enzyme for the synthesis of the compatible solute glucosylglycerol (GG), has a promoter region that overlaps with the upstream-located gene slr1670 in the cyanobacterium Synechocystissp. PCC 6803. Like ggpS, the slr1670 gene is salt-induced and encodes a putative glucosylhydrolase. A mutant strain with a slr1670 deletion was generated and found to be unable to adapt the internal GG concentrations in response to changes in external salinities. Whereas cells of the wild-type reduced the internal pool of GG when exposed to gradual and abrupt hypo-osmotic treatments, or when the compatible solute trehalose was added to the growth medium, the internal GG pool of ∆slr1670 mutant cells remained unchanged. These findings indicated that the protein Slr1670 is involved in GG breakdown. The biochemical activity of this GG-hydrolase enzyme was verified using recombinant Slr1670 protein, which split GG into glucose and glycerol. These results validate that Slr1670, which was named GghA, acts as a GG hydrolase. GghA is involved in GG turnover in fluctuating salinities, and similar proteins are found in the genomes of other GG-synthesizing cyanobacteria.

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2017-08-31
2019-10-14
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