1887

Abstract

Cholesterol has been reported to play an important role during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and during its dormant state inside the host. We present the determination of proteomic profiles of M. tuberculosis H37Rv in the presence of cholesterol as the sole carbon source under exponential growth and in two in vitro dormancy phases (NRP1 and NRP2). Using 2D-PAGE, we detected that M. tuberculosis expressed a high diversity of proteins in both exponential and non-replicative phases. We also found that cholesterol was involved in the overexpression of some proteins related to sulfur metabolism (CysA2), electron transport (FixB), cell wall synthesis (Ald), iron storage (BfrB), protein synthesis (Tig and EF-Tu) and dormancy maintenance (HspX and TB 31.7). According to our results we propose that proteins Ald, BfrB, FadA5 and TB31.7 are likely to play a fundamental role during in vitro dormancy of M. tuberculosis in the presence of cholesterol, helping to counteract its intracellular hostile microenvironment.

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2017-08-04
2019-10-15
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