1887

Abstract

Rho GTPases control polarized cell growth and are well-known regulators of exocytic and endocytic processes. Cdc42 is an essential GTPase, conserved from yeast to humans, that is critical for cell polarization. Cdc42 is negatively regulated by the GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) and the GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs), and positively regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Cdc42 GTPase can be found in a GTP- or GDP-bound state, which determines the ability to bind downstream effector proteins and activate signalling pathways. Only GTP-bound Cdc42 is active. In this study we have analysed the localization of the different nucleotide-bound states of Cdc42 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe: the wild-type Cdc42 protein that cycles between an active and inactive form, the Cdc42G12V form that is permanently bound to GTP and the Cdc42T17N form that is constitutively inactive. Our results indicate that Cdc42 localizes to several membrane compartments in the cell and this localization is mediated by its C-terminal prenylation. Constitutively active Cdc42 localizes mainly to the plasma membrane and concentrates at the growing tips where it is considerably less dynamic than wild-type or GDP-bound Cdc42. Additionally we show that the activation state of Cdc42 also participates in the regulation of its protein levels mediated by endocytosis and by the exocyst complex.

Keyword(s): Cdc42 , fission yeast , GTPase and polarity
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2017-08-18
2019-10-17
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