1887

Abstract

uses choline as a source of carbon and nitrogen, and also for the synthesis of glycine betaine, an osmoprotectant under stress conditions such as drought and salinity. The transcription factor GbdR is the specific regulator of choline metabolism and it belongs to the Arac/XylS family of transcriptional regulators. Despite the link between choline catabolism and bacterial pathogenicity, regulation has not been explored in detail. In the present work, we describe how transcription can be initiated from a σ-dependent promoter. transcription can be activated by NtrC in the absence of a preferential nitrogen source, by CbrB in the absence of a preferential carbon source, and by the integration host factor favouring DNA bending. In addition, we found that BetI negatively regulates expression in the absence of choline. We identified two overlapping BetI binding sites in the promoter sequence, providing an additional example of σ-promoter down-regulation. Based on our findings, we propose a model for regulation and its impact on choline metabolism.

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2017-09-01
2020-01-25
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