1887

Abstract

Isolates of Escherichia coli, except Shigella, are generally prototrophic; they do not require any growth factors to grow in mineral medium. However, a nicotinic acid requirement is common among B2 phylogroup STc95 O18 E. coli clone strains. Nicotinic acid is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), an essential molecule that plays central role in cellular metabolism. The defect in NAD synthesis of these strains is due to alterations in de novo biosynthesis pathway nadB gene. Here, by studying growth on minimal medium with glycolytic (glucose) or gluconeogenic (pyruvate or succinate) substrates as the carbon supply in a large panel of E. coli natural isolates representative of the species diversity, we identify an absolute nicotinic acid requirement in non-STc95 strains due in one case to a nadA inactivation. The growth on glucose medium of some extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains belonging to various non-O18 B2 phylogroup STc95 clones is restored either by aspartate or nicotinate, demonstrating that the nicotinic acid requirement can also be due to an intracellular aspartate depletion. The auxotrophic requirements depend on the carbon source available in the environment. Moreover, some strains prototrophic in glucose medium become auxotrophic in succinate medium, and conversely, some strainsauxotrophic in glucose medium become prototrophic in succinate medium. Finally, a partial depletion of intracellular aspartate can be observed in some prototrophic strains belonging to various phylogroups. The observed more or less significant depletion according to isolates may be due to differences in tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme activities. These metabolic defects could be involved in the adaptation of E. coli to its various niches.

Erratum
This article contains a correction applying to the following content:
Erratum: Diversity of the auxotrophic requirements in natural isolates of Escherichia coli
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2017-06-26
2019-10-21
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