1887

Abstract

The opportunistic human pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia H111 uses two chemically distinct signal molecules for controlling gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner: N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) and cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF). Binding of BDSF to its cognate receptor RpfR lowers the intracellular c-di-GMP level, which in turn leads to differential expression of target genes. In this study we analysed the transcriptional profile of B. cenocepacia H111 upon artificially altering the cellular c-di-GMP level. One hundred and eleven genes were shown to be differentially expressed, 96 of which were downregulated at a high c-di-GMP concentration. Our analysis revealed that the BDSF, AHL and c-di-GMP regulons overlap for the regulation of 24 genes and that a high c-di-GMP level suppresses expression of AHL-regulated genes. Phenotypic analyses confirmed changes in the expression of virulence factors, the production of AHL signal molecules and the biosynthesis of different biofilm matrix components upon altered c-di-GMP levels. We also demonstrate that the intracellular c-di-GMP level determines the virulence of B. cenocepacia to Caenorhabditis elegans and Galleria mellonella.

Keyword(s): Burkholderia and c-di-GMP
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2017-05-03
2019-10-21
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