1887

Abstract

It is important to study commensal populations of because they appear to be the reservoir of both extra-intestinal pathogenic and antibiotic resistant strains of . We studied 279 dominant faecal strains of from 243 adults living in the community in the Paris area in 2010. The phylogenetic group and subgroup [sequence type complex (STc)] of the isolates and the presence of 20 virulence genes were determined by PCR assays. The O-types and resistance to 18 antibiotics were assessed phenotypically. The B2 group was the most frequently recovered (34.0 %), followed by the A group (28.7 %), and other groups were more rare. The most prevalent B2 subgroups were II (STc73), IV (STc141), IX (STc95) and I (STc131), with 22.1, 21.1, 16.8 and 13.7 %, respectively, of the B2 group strains. Virulence factors (VFs) were more common in B2 group than other strains. One or more resistances were found in 125 strains (44.8 % of the collection) but only six (2.2 % of the collection) were multiresistant; no extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing strain was isolated. The C phylogroup and clonal group A strains were the most resistant. No trade-off between virulence and resistance was evidenced. We compared these strains with collections of strains gathered under the same conditions 30 and 10 years ago. There has been a parallel and linked increase in the frequency of B2 group strains (from 9.4 % in 1980, to 22.7 % in 2000 and 34.0 % in 2010) and of VFs. Antibiotic resistance also increased, from 22.6 % of strains resistant to at least one antibiotic in 1980, to 31.8 % in 2000 and 44.8 % in 2010; resistance to streptomycin, however, remained stable. Commensal human populations have clearly evolved substantially over time, presumably reflecting changes in human practices, and particularly increasing antibiotic use.

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2016-04-01
2021-10-26
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