1887

Abstract

The fungus-feeding beetle, , consumed equal quantities of young mycelia, fewer phialides bearing mature spores and much fewer phialides bearing developing spores of compared to those of when tested in diet choice assays. The degree to which specific fungal structures were consumed was inversely related to the localization of high levels of restrictocin, a ribosome-inactivating protein, to those structures. Pure restrictocin added to the insect diet at 1000 p.p.m. killed 38.5% of larvae and 62.5% of larvae in 48 h, but did not affect adults or larvae over the same interval. In diet choice assays, 1000 p.p.m. of restrictocin deterred feeding by adult and compared to control diets. Thus, restrictocin production and localization may have a natural defensive role against insect feeding at times critical to spore formation by , and may have potential as an insect control agent.

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1996-06-01
2021-10-22
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