1887

Abstract

In this study, data on phagocytosis of and its survival inside macrophages are presented. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were incubated in the presence of one of five different strains of capsular type 2: a virulent wild-type strain (1591), a non-capsulated non-virulent mutant strain (M2), a poorly capsulated non-virulent mutant strain (M42), a non-virulent capsulated strain (1330), and the wild-type reference (virulent) strain 5735. Opsonized or non-opsonized bacteria were incubated with macrophages and samples were obtained after 1 and 3 h incubation. Phagocytosis as well as live and dead intracellular organisms were determined by acridine orange and crystal violet staining. After 1 h incubation, non-opsonized virulent and non-virulent capsulated bacteria were poorly phagocytosed (by less than 7% of the macrophages), whereas the non-capsulated non-virulent mutant strain was highly phagocytosed (by more than 68% of the macrophages). The M42 mutant strain was more phagocytosed than the capsulated strains but less than the non-capsulated M2 mutant strain (35%). In contrast, a higher percentage of live bacteria was observed inside macrophages for the capsulated strains (1591 and S735) than for the non- or poorly capsulated mutant strains (M2 and M42). Opsonization of bacteria with rabbit serum or heat-inactivated rabbit serum significantly increased phagocytosis. For every opsonized strain, after 3 h incubation, the percentage of live bacteria within macrophages was considerably lower than the corresponding non-opsonized strains. In conclusion, the capsule of type 2 appears to act as an important anti-phagocytic factor. However, virulent capsulated non-opsonized strains can be phagocytosed by mouse peritoneal macrophages within which they appear to survive for at least 3 h. Serum factors other than complement increase not only phagocytosis but also intracellular killing of of both capsulated and non-capsulated strains.

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1996-05-01
2021-05-18
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