1887

Abstract

A DNA contig of 26·2 kb covering the 170° region of the strain 168 genome was isolated and sequenced. For DNA isolation, suitable restriction sites at the end of previously known genes were chosen to amplify adjacent unknown DNA regions by inverse PCR. On the basis of the DNA sequence, 26 ORFs were identified of which and as well as parts of and have been described previously. Here we report the complete sequences of the aconitase () and transketolase () genes. Of the other proteins encoded on the 26·2 kb fragment, eight revealed similarities to previously described proteins. These included a pair of newly identified DNA gyrase subunits A () and B (), a sodium/proton-dependent alanine carrier (), a member of the thioredoxin family (), an endo-1,4--xylanase () and a response regulator protein. Comparison of the physical and the genetic maps revealed several differences. According to its flanking sequences the gene which was previously mapped at 162° was found to be adjacent to localized at 170°. Genes and were located the opposite way round and closer together than expected from the genetic map ( at 173° and at 170°). The gene, which was mapped at 169°, was not present on the respective fragment. Sequence comparison actually showed that is located close to 70° on the genome.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/13500872-142-11-3097
1996-11-01
2022-01-16
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