1887

Abstract

Summary: Ultrastructural changes in the plasma membrane of during the exponential and stationary growth phases were studied by freeze-etching. In the exponential phase, plasma membrane-intercalated particles were distributed randomly. In the stationary phase, several areas of the plasma membrane showed a hexagonal arrangement of particles; these areas appeared to increase with the age of the culture. The polarity of the particles also changed partially: the E-face of the plasma membrane was only sparsely embedded with particles in exponential phase cells, but relatively densely embedded in stationary phase cells. Invaginations of the plasma membrane on the P-face were devoid of particles during both growth phases. Invaginations of the E-face were sparsely embedded with particles in exponential phase cells, but densely embedded with particles in stationary phase cells.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-97-2-323
1976-12-01
2021-05-11
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