1887

Abstract

Summary: Carbon assimilation by , growing as a parasite on cereals, has been investigated by supplying the host plant with CO in a closed system. The presence of the pathogen induced the plant to exude photosynthate which contained high levels of sucrose. During the period of CO supply, C was incorporated into the sucrose and so the path of carbon into the parasite could be traced. Hexoses, derived by the action of the fungal sucrase on sucrose, were assimilated by the pathogen and largely converted into polyols - mainly mannitol and, to a lesser extent, trehalose. The rate of carbohydrate metabolism decreased with maturation of the ergot, and also showed qualitative differences between the basal and apical regions of the ergot which were probably a function of nutrient supply.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-97-2-267
1976-12-01
2021-05-15
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