1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: 7 (a mutant deficient in diaminopimelate epimerase), excreted diaminopimelate (solely -isomer) after growth in a minimal medium plus lysine with succinate as carbon source. More diaminopimelate was excreted when bacteria were transferred at the end of the exponential phase of growth into fresh minimal medium without lysine but supplemented with pyruvate and additional (NH)SO. The excreted -isomer was isolated from the culture filtrate by ion-exchange chromatography and purified by crystallization (17 g/9 1 culture).

A diaminopimelate-requiring mutant of 7581 grew on - and/or -diaminopimelate but not on the -isomer. This mutant was used to isolate the -isomer from a mixture of synthetic - and -diaminopimelate. It was grown in a minimal medium containing glycerol as carbon source and -plus -diaminopimelate at a growth-limiting concentration (300 mg l); when growth stopped, the -diaminopimelate that remained in the culture was isolated and crystallized (10 g/11 l culture).

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1976-10-01
2021-10-25
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