1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: The separation of the smallest cells from an exponentially growing culture by passage through a continuous flow centrifuge rotor under controlled conditions of rotor speed and flow rate, provides a simple method for the rapid production of large-scale synchronous cultures. The effluent from the rotor, containing the smallest-sized class of organisms, still suspended in their growth medium and still growing undisturbed throughout this rapid procedure, provides a culture which goes on to exhibit synchronous cell division. Successfully applied to budding and fission yeasts and to amoeboid and ciliated protozoa, this procedure is potentially applicable to any non-filamentous, non-aggregating, unicellular organism or to cells of higher plants or animals growing in liquid tissue-cultures.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-88-1-153
1975-05-01
2021-10-23
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