1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: When a culture of the temperature-sensitive DNA mutant tsSI is irradiated with a sublethal dose of ultraviolet or ionizing radiation and is plated immediately, all the bacteria give rise, after 36 h incubation, to colonies identical to those derived from unirradiated bacteria. However, when the irradiated population is held at its restrictive temperature (39 °C) (restrictive temperature holding) for 3 h before being plated, less than 0·1% of the surviving bacteria give rise to normal colonies, the rest producing, after incubation for 96 h, small malformed colonies. Qualitatively, the same effect is observed when u.v.-irradiated wild-type is incubated at 39 °C in the presence of nalidixic acid before plating. Compared with the loss of viability, the loss of normal colony development as a function of the radiation dose is sensitive, having I/e values of 210 ergs/mm for u.v. radiation and of 4 to 5 krad for Co -radiation. These are identical to the radiation dose-response values of a recombination-deficient mutant of At first the abnormal colonies consist entirely of giant bacteria but eventually a few bacteria with normal morphology appear and because of their much faster generation time a highly sectored colony results. These colonies can be ‘rescued’ by plating the irradiated bacteria held at 39 °C on agar containing pantoyl lactone, their growth being identical to that of unirradiated bacteria. Abnormal colony development is not a general phenomenon in temperature-sensitive mutants of but occurs in those mutants which are sensitized to radiation when held at 39 °C. It is concluded that these abnormal colonies are produced as a result of a defect in a recombination function and that this function is also involved in the regulation of normal cell division.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-86-2-343
1975-02-01
2021-10-23
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