1887

Abstract

Summary: Washed suspensions of spp. grown and incubated anaero-bically in salts medium engulfed all the bacteria tested at rates ranging from 60 to 7000/protozoon/h at a density of 10/ml. The rate of uptake of bacteria was also compared by the volume of medium cleared of bacteria/h. On both bases was taken up most rapidly. Some of the bacteria were killed and digested inside the protozoa. The spp. took up a wide range of amino acids at rates varying from 6 to 250 nmol/10 protozoa/h and incorporated them into protein, mostly without conversion to other amino acids. The protozoa also incorporated purines and pyrimidines into nucleic acid and interconverted adenine and guanine and also uracil and cytosine.

took up [C]gIucose more rapidly than and used the glucose carbon for the synthesis of an intracellular glucose polysaccharide and at least eight amino acids, 15 % of the C in the protozoa appearing in protein. The protozoa also synthesized protein from starch grains. Evidence has been obtained that cannot obtain all the protein it requires for growth from bacteria, free amino acids, glucose or starch and must incorporate protein from the wholemeal flour on which it is grown.

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1974-12-01
2021-10-27
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