1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Glu-6-PDH) from (Lib.) de Bary were moderately active in submerged mycelium while in non-sclerotial aerial mycelium arylesterase and acid phosphatase were very active. In sclerotial initials, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gly-3-PDH) and SDH were at their highest level of activity, Glu-6-PDH and phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGDH) were moderately active, laccase activity increased markedly, and tyrosinase was detected for the first time, its activity being moderate. In young compacting sclerotia, the activities of Glu-6-PDH and PGDH increased, Gly-3-PDH and SDH showed lowered activities, and laccase activity decreased. Suppression of the glycolytic Krebs-cycle pathway and the stimulation of the pentose phosphate pathway seem important during the compaction and maturation of sclerotia. Tyrosinase may be involved in sclerotial initiation.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-81-1-101
1974-03-01
2021-10-23
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