1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The phage reactions and pathogenicity of English isolates of were compared with those of isolates from other countries. Nonindigenous cherry strains resembled English cherry strains pathologically, but not all were sensitive to A7, the type-determining phage for English cherry strains. Plum strains resistant to A7 adsorbed the phage as readily as cherry strains, indicating that phage receptor materials are not involved in host specificity. Cherry strain mutants resistant to specific and/or non-specific phages showed marked attenuation of virulence, although retaining the essential pathological characters of cherry strains. The resistance of all but one of the mutants was due to failure to adsorb the homologous phage, showing that the wall structure had changed and suggesting that wall components may function as general virulence determinants in

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1974-02-01
2021-07-27
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