1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Methionine is a substrate for ethylene formation in , but glucose is also required for maximal ethylene production. The formation of ethylene from these substrates in a defined mineral salts medium was studied both with sealed shaken flasks and with a chemostat. Oxygen promoted growth and ethylene production per unit weight of organism. That anaerobic conditions appear to be necessary to observe ethylene accumulation in the soil is probably because soil anaerobiosis mobilizes the substrates required for ethylene biosynthesis.

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1974-01-01
2021-10-24
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