1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Graded doses of six phytopathogenic bacteria, namely and were introduced into the leaves of one of their natural (homologous) hosts and of other (heterologous) plants. Probit slopes for the infectivity of any of the six bacteria did not exceed the value = 2 in the homologous combinations, but were much greater than 2 in the heterologous ones. In the homologous combinations, the mean probability, per inoculated bacterium of multiplying to induce host response was invariant to inoculum dose, Hence the probability, that a host would not respond after inoculation with bacteria was given by the simple exponential, . In the heterologous combinations, the value of increased with increasing .

When a streptomycin-sensitive and a streptomycin-resistant variant of the same bacterium were mixed together in a I: I proportion in the challenge dose, plants responding after inoculation with a heterologous pathogen yielded a mixture of both variants in the same proportion, whereas those responding to inoculation with a homologous pathogen yielded either a I : I mixture of both variants or a large predominance of a single variant, depending on whether the dose contained more or less than i ED 50. It was concluded from these experiments that the relationships between inoculated cells of homologous and heterologous bacteria during growth were described best by the hypothesis of independent action and the hypothesis of co-operative action, respectively.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-75-1-83
1973-03-01
2022-01-16
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/75/1/mic-75-1-83.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-75-1-83&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Armitage P. 1959; An examination of some experimental cancer data in the light of the one-hit theory of infectivity titrations. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 23:1313–1330
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Crosse J. E. 1959; Bacterial canker of stone fruits. IV. Investigation of a method for measuring the inoculum potential of cherry trees. Annals of Applied Biology 47:306–317
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Druett H. A. 1952; Bacterial invasion. Nature, London 170:288
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Ercolani G. L. 1967a; Bacterial canker of tomato. I. Analysis of some factors affecting the response of tomato to Corynebacterium michiganense (E. F. Sm.) Jens. Phytopathologia Mediterranea 6:19–29
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Ercolani G. L. 1967b; Bacterial canker of tomato. II. Interpretation of the aetiology of the quantal response of tomato to Corynebacterium michiganense (E. F. Sm.) Jens, by the hypothesis of independent action. Phytopathologia Mediterranea 6:30–40
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Ercolani G. L. 1968a; Growth of bacteria in plant tissue. In Abstracts of Papers, First International Congress of Plant Pathology p 55 London: International Society for Plant Pathology;
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Ercolani G. L. 1968b; Schizomycetes. In Manuale di Patologia Vegetale vol 3 pp 1–456 Edited by Goidanich G. Bologna: Edizioni Agricole;
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Ercolani G. L. 1970; Bacterial canker of tomato. IV. The interaction between virulent and avirulent strains of Corynebacterium michiganense (E. F. Sm.) Jens. in vivo. Phytopathologia Mediterranea 9:151–159
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Ercolani G. L. 1972; Dynamics of infection by Pseudomonasphaseolicola in partially resistant populations of bean. Phytopathology 62:756
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Ercolani G. L., Crosse J. E. 1966; The growth of Pseudomonas phaseolicola and related plant pathogens in vivo. Journal of General Microbiology 45:429–439
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Finney D. J. 1971 Probit Analysis, 3rd edn. Cambridge University Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Gardner J. M., Kado C. I. 1972; Induction of the hypersensitive reaction in tobacco with specific high-molecular weight substances derived from the osmotic shock fluid of Erwinia rubrifaciens. Phytopathology 62:759
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Hildebrand E. M. 1937; Infectivity of the fire-blight organism. Phytopathology 27:850–852
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Hildebrand E. M. 1942; A micrurgical study of crown gall infection in tomato. Journal of Agricultural Research 65:45–59
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Hildebrand D. C., Riddle B. 1971; Influence of environmental conditions on reactions induced by infiltration of bacteria into plant leaves. Hilgardia 41:33–43
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Hoagland D. R., Snyder W. C. 1933; Nutrition of strawberry plant under controlled conditions. (A) Effects of deficiencies of boron and certain other elements. (B) Susceptibility to injury from sodium salts. Proceedings of the American Society for Horticultural Science 30:288–294
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Horsfall J. G. 1932; Dusting tomato seed with copper sulfate monohydrate for combating damping-off. New York State Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Bulletinno. 19834 pp
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Klement Z. 1971; Development of the hypersensitivity reaction induced by plant pathogenic bacteria. In Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Plant Pathogenic Bacteria pp 157–164 Edited by Maas H. P. Geesteranus. Wageningen: Centre for Agricultural Publishing and Documentation;
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Klement Z., Farkas G. L., Lovrekovich L. 1964; Hypersensitive reaction induced by phytopathogenic bacteria in the tobacco leaf. Phytopathology 54:474–477
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Klement Z., Goodman R. N. 1967a; The hypersensitive reaction to infection by bacterial plant pathogens. Annual Review of Phytopathology 5:17–44
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Klement Z., Goodman R. N. 1967b; The role of the living bacterial cell and induction time in the hypersensitive reaction of the tobacco plant. Phytopathology 57:322–323
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Klement Z., Lovrekovich L. 1961; Defence reactions induced by phytopathogenic bacteria in bean pods. Phytopathologische Zeitschrift 41:217–227
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Klement Z., Lovrekovich L. 1962; Studies on host–parasite relations in bean pods infected with bacteria. Phytopathologische Zeitschrift 45:81–88
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Lederberg J., Lederberg E. M. 1952; Replica plating and indirect selection of bacterial mutants. Journal of Bacteriology 63:399–406
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Lelliott R. A., Billing E., Hayward A. C. 1966; A determinative scheme for the fluorescent plant pathogenic pseudomonads. Journal of Applied Bacteriology 29:470–489
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Lippincott J. A., Heberlein G. T. 1965; The quantitative determination of the infectivity of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. American Journal of Botany 52:856–863
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Logan C. 1960; Host specificity of two Xanthomonas species. Nature, London 188:479–480
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Manigault P., Beaud G. 1967; Expression de l’efficacité de la bactérie Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Smith et Town) Conn dans l’induction tumorale (Datura stramonium L.). Annales de I’Institut Pasteur 112:445–457
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Meynell G. G. 1957; Inherently low precision of infectivity titrations using a quantal response. Biometrics 13:149–163
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Meynell G. G., Meynell E. 1970 Theory and Practice in Experimental Bacteriology, 2nd edn. Cambiidge University Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Meynell G. G., Stocker B. A. D. 1957; Some hypotheses on the aetiology of fatal infections in partially resistant hosts and their application to mice challenged with Salmonella paratyphi-B or Salmonella typhimurium by intraperitoneal injection. Journal of General Microbiology 16:38–58
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Pérombelon M. C. M. 1971; A quantitative method for assessing virulence of Erwinia carotovora var. carotovora and E. carotovora var. atroseptica and susceptibility to rotting of potato tuber tissue. In Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Plant Pathogenic Bacteria pp 299–303 Edited by Maas H. P. Geesteranus. Wageningen: Centre for Agricultural Publishing and Documentation;
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Peto S. 1953; A dose–response equation for the invasion of micro-organisms. Biometrics 9:320–335
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Seligman S. J., Mickey M. R. 1964; Estimation of the number of infectious bacterial or viral particles by the dilution method. Journal of Bacteriology 88:31–36
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Sequeira L., Ainslie V. 1969; Bacterial cell-free preparations that induce or prevent the hypersensitive reaction in tobacco. In Abstracts of Papers, Ninth International Botanical Congress p 195 Seattle: Botanical Society of America;
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Shortley G., Wilkins J. R. 1965; Independent-action and birth-death models in experimental microbiology. Bacteriological Reviews 29:102–141
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Sleesman H. C., Perley J. E., Hoitink H. A. J. 1970; Susceptible and hypersensitive reactions in tobacco and their prevention by cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas tabaci and Pseudomonas glycinea. Phytopathology 60:1314
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Thyr B. D. 1968; Bacterial canker of tomato: inoculum level needed for infection. Plant Disease Reporter 52:741–743
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-75-1-83
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-75-1-83
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error