1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Lipopolysaccharides were obtained from a number of strains of yellow-pigmented rods identified as Cytophaga species and from representative strains of fruiting myxobacteria. The major monosaccharide components of the lipopolysaccharides were identified by paper chromatography and subsequent analysis. Most preparations contained ribose, mannose and galactose and no major differences were seen between the composition of fruiting and non-fruiting myxobacterial lipopolysaccharides. Other sugars detected included rhamnose, glucose, glucosamine and galactosamine, but some of the polymers may also contain small amounts of other monosaccharides which have not yet been identified. The chemical similarity of the lipopolysaccharides to analogous polymers from other Gram-negative bacteria confirms the belief from cytological studies that the cell wall of myxobacteria resembles that of typical Gram-negative prokaryotes.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-74-2-259
1973-02-01
2022-01-27
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