1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: At 21°, conidia of were first discharged from infected pea aphids about 6 to 9 h. after the aphids died and the rate of discharge was highest during a short period about 9 h. later. In constant light, the rate then decreased and discharge ended about 36 h. after an infected aphid died; in constant darkness the maximum rate (2 × 10 conidia/h./aphid) was only one-quarter of that in constant light but it was maintained for 10 h. In alternating 12 h. light, 12 h. darkness, the rate of conidium discharge increased substantially 2 h. after the admission of light and much decreased 2 h. after light was excluded. In constant light, the average number of conidia discharged from one adult apterous aphid was at least 10, twice that in constant darkness. Discharge of conidia began earliest at 20° but the rate of discharge was highest at 25°. Ultimately, similar numbers of conidia were discharged at any temperature from 5 to 25°; conidia were not discharged at 0 or 30°.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-69-3-417
1971-12-01
2022-01-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/69/3/mic-69-3-417.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-69-3-417&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Ali S. B. 1957 A Mycological Study of a Species of Entomophthora Attacking Aphids Ph.D. Thesis University of London:
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Callaghan A. A. 1969; Light and spore discharge in Entomophthorales. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 53:87–97
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Ege O. 1965; Ein Beitrag zur Biologie einiger aphidivorer Entomophthoraceen. Archiv für Mikrobiologie 52:20–48
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Evlakhova A. A., Voronina E. 1965; Study on the Entomophthorosis of Aphididae for their practical application. Proceedings of XIII International Congress of Entomology, London, 1964 p. 751
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Gilbert E. M., Kuntz W. A. 1926; Some diseases of Aphis spiraecola Patch. Quarterly Bulletin of the Florida State Plant Board 10:1–6
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Goldstein B. 1923; Resting spores of Empusa muscae . Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 50:317–327
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Hamilton E. D. 1959; Studies on the air-spora. Acta Allergologica 13:143–175
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Hirst J. M. 1953; Changes in atmospheric spore content: diurnal periodicity and the effects of weather. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 36:375–393
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Ingold C. T., Cox V. J. 1955; Periodicity of spore discharge in Daldinia . Annals of Botany 19:201–209
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Ingold C. T., Dring V. J. 1957; An analysis of spore discharge in Sordaria . Annals of Botany 21:465–477
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Speare A. T. 1912; Fungi parasitic upon insects injurious to sugar cane.(Report. Hawaiian Sugar Planters’ Association Experiment Station.). Pathology and Physiology Serial Bulletin 12:1–62
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Wilding N. 1969; Effect of humidity on the sporulation of Entomophthora aphidis and E. thaxteriana . Transactions of the British Mycological Society 53:126–130
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Yendol W. G., Paschke J. D. 1967; Infection of a looper complex by Entomophthora sphaerosperma Fresenius. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 9:274–276
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-69-3-417
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-69-3-417
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error