1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the growth of 2 in a mineral glucose medium was investigated. The HO produced a lag period, the duration of which increased as the concentration of HO in the medium was increased from 1 to 60 g./ml. Growth subsequent to the lag period proceeded at the normal growth rate at concentrations of HO as high as 30 g./ml. Storage of HO in the sterile growth medium resulted in a disappearance of HO with a half-life of about 48 hr. The disappearance of HO because of reaction with glucose resulted in proportionate decreases in the growth inhibitory action of the medium. destroyed HO rapidly (half-time = 60 min.)–an effect attributed largely to bacterial catalase. The catalatic activity of the bacteria was decreased or eliminated by boiling or by treatment with cyanide. The growth of the bacteria in HO resulted in the development of HO resistance. By subculturing the wild type 2 in medium containing successively higher HO concentration, a resistant strain designated 2 was isolated which grew in the presence of HO concentrations that were completely inhibitory to the wild type.

The experimental results support the generally accepted conclusion that bacterial catalase acts in protecting the organism from HO. It is pointed out that in biological media HO readily forms adducts with many compounds, including carbonyls, amino acids and thymine. Consequently, the inhibitory effects of HO, especially in studies involving auxotrophs, may be partly or wholly due to the peroxide adduct rather than ‘free’ HO.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-57-1-25
1969-07-01
2021-07-29
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