1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Quantitative absorption of antisera was used to study the effect of calcium on the antigenic surface of Antisera to Ca-deficient and Ca-adequate rhizobia (whole or broken) revealed two parts in the absorption curve: in which there was ready removal of most of the agglutinating antibody with a very small absorbing dose; in which the remaining agglutinating antibody resisted absorption. When Ca-adequate bacteria were used for absorption, range I consisted of about 87% of the total titre. The corresponding figure with Ca-deficient bacteria was 95%. These values have been attributed to three types of antibody; avid I (readily absorbed by either kind of bacterium), avid 2 (readily absorbed by Ca-deficient bacteria), non-avid (difficult to absorb with either bacterium). The fact that avid antibody 2 was absorbed readily by Ca-deficient bacteria but with difficulty by Ca-adequate bacteria may be due to a quantitative deficiency of a particular antigen on the surface of the Ca-adequate bacterium, or to a structural condition which gives the antigen lower affinity for its homologous antibody. Absorption characteristic of Ca-deficient rhizobia was obtained with the Ca-adequate bacteria treated with EDTA under conditions known to remove 90% of Ca from the cell. Broken bacteria to some extent simulated the absorption curve found with Ca-deficient bacteria. It is suggested that Ca located in the surface lipopolysaccharide layer of the wall of rhizobium grown with a sufficiency of this element obscures or modifies an antigenic group. Glucuronic acid found in the somatic antigen fraction of this bacterium is suggested as a possible site of Ca action.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-54-3-397
1968-12-01
2021-10-20
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/54/3/mic-54-3-397.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-54-3-397&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. ASBELL M. A., EAGON R. G. 1966; Role of multivalent cations in the organisation structure and assembly of the cell wall of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.. J. Bact. 92:380
    [Google Scholar]
  2. CARSON K. J., EAGON R. G. 1966; Lysozyme sensitivity of the cell wall of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: further evidence for the role of the non-peptidoglycan components in cell wall rigidity.. Can. J. Microbiol. 12:105
    [Google Scholar]
  3. CRAW J. A. 1905; On the mechanism of agglutination.. J. Hyg. Camb. 5:113
    [Google Scholar]
  4. EAGON R. G., CARSON K. J. 1965; Lysis of cell walls and intact cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid and by lysozyme.. Can. J. Microbiol. 11:193
    [Google Scholar]
  5. EAGON R. G., SIMMONS G. P., CARSON K. J. 1965; Evidence for the presence of ash and divalent metals in the cell wall ofPseudomonasaeruginosa.. Can. J. Microbiol. 11:1041
    [Google Scholar]
  6. EISENBERG P., VOLK R. 1902; Untersuchung iiber die Agglutination.. Z. Hyg. InfektKr. 40:155
    [Google Scholar]
  7. GRAY G. W., WILKINSON S. G. 1965; The action of ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.. J. appl. Bact. 28:153
    [Google Scholar]
  8. HEIDELBERGER M., KABAT E. A. 1937; Chemical studies on bacterial agglutination. HI. A reaction mechanism and a quantitative theory.. J. exp. Med. 65:885
    [Google Scholar]
  9. HUMPHREY B. A., VINCENT J. M. 1962; Calcium in cell walls of Rhizobium trifolii.. J. gen. Microbiol. 29:557
    [Google Scholar]
  10. HUMPHREY B. A., VINCENT J. M. 1965; The effect of calcium nutrition on the production of diffusible antigens by.. Rhizobium trifolii J. gen. Microbiol. 41:109
    [Google Scholar]
  11. HUMPHREY B. A., MARSHALL K. C., VINCENT J. M. 1968; Electrophoretic mobility of calcium- adequate and calcium-deprived.. Rhizobium trifolii J. Bact. 95:721
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Leive L. 1965; Release of lipopolysaccharides byEDTA treatment of Escherichia coli.. Biochem. biophys. Res. Commun. 21:290
    [Google Scholar]
  13. LUDERITZ O., STAUB A. M., WESTPHAL O. 1966; Immunochemistry of O and R antigens of Salmonella and related Enterobacteriaceae.. Bact. Rev. 30:192
    [Google Scholar]
  14. NOLLER E. C., HARTSELL S. E. 1961; Bacteriolysis of Enterobacteriaceae. II. Pre- and co-lytic treatments potentiating the action of lysozyme.. J.Bact. 81:492
    [Google Scholar]
  15. NEILL G. J., TODD J. P. 1961; Extracts of nucleic acid free lipopolysaccharides from Gram-negative bacteria.. Nature Lond. 190:344
    [Google Scholar]
  16. PIKE R. M. 1967; Antibody heterogeneity and serological reactions.. Bact. Rev. 31:157
    [Google Scholar]
  17. REPASKE R. 1956; Lysis of Gram-negative organisms by lysozyme. . Biochim. biophys. Acta 22:189
    [Google Scholar]
  18. SALTON M. R. J. 1958; The lysis of micro-organisms by lysozyme and related enzymes.. J. gen. Microbiol. 18:481
    [Google Scholar]
  19. VINCENT J. M. 1962; Influence of calcium and magnesium on the growth of Rhizobium.. J. gen. Microbiol. 28:653
    [Google Scholar]
  20. VINCENT J. M., COLBURN J. R. 1961; Cytological abnormalities inRhizobium trifolii due to deficiency of calcium or magnesium.. Aust. J. Sci. 23:269
    [Google Scholar]
  21. VINCENT J. M., HUMPHREY B. A. 1963; Partition of divalent cations between bacterial wall and and cell contents.. Nature, Lond, 199:149
    [Google Scholar]
  22. WEINBAUM G., RICH R., FESCHMAN D. A. 1967; Enzyme-induced formation of spheres from cells and envelopes of Escherichia coli.. J. Bact. 93:693
    [Google Scholar]
  23. WILSON G. S., MILES A. A. 1932; The serological differentiation of smooth strains of the Brucella group.. Br. J. exp. Path. 13:1
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-54-3-397
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-54-3-397
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error