1887

Abstract

Summary: Washed suspensions of a laboratory strain of did not take up oxygen with, or ferment, five carbohydrates, nor did the same strain produce detectable acid from fourteen carbohydrates during growth. Of twenty-one amino-acids tested only proline, serine, alanine, aspartic and glutamic acids were oxidized by washed suspensions at an approciable rate. The first four of these were oxidized to completion but with glutamic acid only 80% of the theoretical uptake of oxygen occurred; however, in the presence of dinitrophenol it, too, was oxidized to completion. Cells oxidizing glutamic acid in the presence of arsenite produced α-ketoglutaric acid.

During the logarithmic growth of glutamic acid disappeared from Cohen & Wheeler’s medium. The organism grew in a Cohen & Wheeler’s medium in which the Casamino acids had been replaced by glutamic acid. These results suggest that glutamic acid can serve as energy, carbon and nitrogen source for

Some of the findings were confirmed with freshly isolated strains.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-5-5-951
1951-12-01
2021-10-20
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/5/5/mic-5-5-951.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-5-5-951&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Adler E., Hellström V., Günter G., Euler H.V. 1938; Über den enzyma- tischen Abbau und Aufbau der Glutaminsaure. Hoppe-Seyl. Z. 255:14
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Barker H.A. 1939; The use of glutamic acid for the isolation and identification of Clostridium cochlearium and Cl. tetanomorphum. Arch. Mikrobiol. 10:376
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bordet J., Gengou O. 1907; Note complémentaire sur le microbe de la coqueluche. Ann. Inst.Pasteur 21:720
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Cavallini D., Frontali N., Toschi G. 1949; Determination of keto-acids by partition chromatography on filter-paper. Nature; Lond.: 163568
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Clifton C.E. 1946; Microbial assimilations. Advances in Enzymology 6:269
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Cohen S.M., Wheeler M.W. 1946; Pertussis vaccine prepared with phase I cultures grown in fluid medium. Amer.J. pub.Hlth 36:371
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Dawson B., Farnworth E.H., Mcleod J.W., Nicholson D.E. 1951; Observations on the value of the Bordet-Gengou medium for the cultivation of Haemophilus pertussis. J. gen. Microbiol. 5:408
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Euler H.V., Adler E., Eriksen T.S. 1937; Über die Komponenten der Dehydrasesysteme. XIV. Glutaminsaure-dehydrase aus Hefe. Hoppe-Seyl. Z. 248:227
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Farrell L., Taylor E.M. 1945; Notes on the production of phase I pertussis vaccine in fluid medium. Canad. pub. Hlth J. 36:326
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Fildes P. 1923; The classification of haemoglobinophilic bacteria, based upon their relation to blood-pigment and to the ‘vitamine’ factor. Brit.J. exp. Path. 4:265
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Gale E.F. 1938; Factors influencing bacterial deamination. III. Aspartase II. Its occurrence in and extraction from Bacterium coli and its activation by adenosine and related compounds. Biochem.J. 32:1583
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Gale E.F. 1945; Studies on bacterial amino-acid decarboxylases. 5. The use of specific decarboxylase preparations in the estimation of amino-acids and in protein analysis. Biochem.J. 39:46
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Gale E.F., Stephenson M. 1938; Factors influencing bacterial deamination. II. Factors influencing the activity of dl-serine deaminase in Bacterium coli. Biochem.J. 32:392
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Gerhardt P., Tucker L.A., Wilson J.B. 1950; The nutrition of Brucellae: utilization of single amino-acids for growth. J. Bact. 59:777
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Gladstone G.P., Fildes P. 1940; A simple culture medium for general use without meat extract or peptone. Brit.J. exp. Path. 21:161
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Horn M.J., Jones D.B., Blum A.E. 1946; Microbiological determination of methionine in proteins and foods. J.biol. Chem. 166:321
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Hornibrook J.W. 1939; Cultivation of phase I H. pertussis in a semi-synthetic liquid medium. Publ. Hlth Rep., Wash. 54:1847
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Hornibrook J.W. 1940; Nicotinic acid as a growth factor for H. pertussis. Proc. Soc. exp. Biol., N.Y. 45:598
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Johnson M.J. 1941; Isolation and properties of a pure yeast polypeptidase. J.Mol. Chem. 137:575
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Klein J.R. 1940; The oxidation of 1(-) aspartic and 1( + ) glutamic acids by Hemophilus parainfluenzae. J. Mol. Chem. 134:43
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Krampitz L.O., Werkman C.H. 1941; The enzymic decarboxylation of oxaloacetate. Biochem.J. 35:595
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Krebs H.A. 1933; Weitere Untersuchungen iiber den Abbau der Aminosauren im Tierkorper. Hoppe-Seyl. Z. 218:157
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Krebs H.A. 1948; Quantitative determination of glutamine and glutamic acid. Biochem.J. 43:51
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Lawson G.M. 1939; Immunity studies in pertussis. Amer.J. Hyg. 29:119
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Mackie T.J., Mccartney J.E. 1948 Handbook of Practical Bacteriology, 8th ed.. Edinburgh:: E. and S.ivingstone.;
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Markham R. 1942; A steam distillation apparatus suitable for micro-Kjeldahl analysis. Biochem.J. 36:790
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Pollock M.R. 1947; The growth of H. pertussis on media without blood. Brit.J. exp. Path. 28:295
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Pollock M.R. 1949; The effects of long-chain fatty acids on the growth of Haemophilus pertussis and other organisms. Symp. Soc. exp. Biol. 3:193
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Rivers T.M. 1922a; Bacterial nutrition. Growth of a hemophilic bacillus on media containing only an autoclave-stable substance as an accessory factor. Johns Hopk. Hosp. Bull. 33:149
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Rivers T.M. 1922b; Bacillus hemoglobinophilus canis (Friedberger). J.Bact. 7:579
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Stamp Lord. 1947; The preservation of bacteria by drying. J. gen. Microbiol. 1:251
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Standfast A.F.B. 1951; The virulence of Haemophilus pertussis for mice by the intranasal route. J. gen. Microbiol. 5:250
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Stillman E.G., Bourn J.M. 1920; Biological study of the hemophilic bacilli. J. exp. Med. 32:665
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Umbreit W.W., Burris R.H., Stauffer J.F. 1945 Manometric Techniques. Minneapolis: Burgess Publishing Co.;
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Ungar J., James A.M., Muggleton P.W., Pegler H.F., Tomich E.G. 1950; The cultivation of Haemophilus pertussis in partially defined liquid media. J.gen. Microbiol. 4:345
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Verwey W.F., Thiele E.H., Sage D.N., Schuchardt L.F. 1949; A simplified liquid culture medium for the growth of Hemophilus pertussis. J. Bact. 58:127
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Weil-Malherbe H., Krebs H.A. 1935; Metabolism of amino-acids. V. The conversion of proline into glutamic acid in kidney. Biochem.J. 29:2077
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Wilson R.J. 1945; The production of phase I pertussis vaccine in casein hydrolysate broth. Canad. publ. Hlth J. 36:821
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Winslow C.-E.A., Broadhurst J., Buchanan R.E., Krumwiede C., Rogers L.A., Smith G.H. 1920; The families and genera of the bacteria. Final report of the Committee of the Society of American Bacteriologists on characterization and classification of bacterial types. J. Bact. 5:191
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-5-5-951
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-5-5-951
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error