1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

When salmonella organisms were put into the rumen of cattle their subsequent growth or elimination depended on the dietary intake before and after the organisms were ingested. When the animals were receiving a regular daily ration of 6·8 kg. lucerne hay the organisms were rapidly eliminated from the rumen and viable organisms in the faeces were rarely detected. Decreasing the daily food intake to 2·3 kg. or interruption of feeding for one or more days retarded the elimination of salmonellas and or permitted their growth in the rumen. Growth of salmonellas and type I occurred during starvation, and resumption of feeding after starvation caused further multiplication. Starvation for 2 or 3 days was generally followed by infection of the intestine, with salmonellas persisting in the faeces for at least a week.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-46-1-125
1967-01-01
2021-07-28
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