1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Phase I was grown in a chemically defined medium containing 20 amino acids (including glutamine) plus glutathione. Growth was limited by depletion of three of the components, L-glutamic acid, L-proline and L-glutamine. Increasing the concentrations of these three components more than doubled the yield of organism. The following components were utilized, but did not limit growth: alanine, glycine, histidine, serine; cystine and glutathione were also substantially used. Ten amino acids which were not utilized to any significant extent could be omitted without diminishing growth. A preferential order of amino acid utilization is suggested. Glutamic acid appears to be important for antigenicity.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-44-3-439
1966-09-01
2021-08-01
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