1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Eleven brucellaphages of Russian or Polish origin were examined to determine their biological, biochemical and physical characteristics. All the phages gave clear plaques of variable size (0·5–3·5 mm.) on the host strain 19. Plaque formation occurred with all smooth cultures of and cultures were incompletely lysed or inhibited by high-titre (about 1 × 10 plaque-forming units/ml.) phage. This was shown to be true phage lysis since small (0·5 mm.) turbid plaques were later observed with this host. A partial inhibition or lysis of cultures of by high-titre phage was noted and could be associated with the presence of intact phage. Replication of phage on this host without plaque formation was observed by means of an elution technique. The phages reacted serologically as a group and comparative studies by electron microscopy indicated a very similar if not identical morphology. The average dimensions of the phage head were 59 × 66 m and it presented an outline consistent with that of a regular icosahedron. Attached to the phage head was a short (10 × 23 m) tail having a somewhat wedge-shaped terminal end. The % guanine + cytosine of the DNA from and the eleven brucellaphages was determined from the thermal denaturation temperature of their nucleic acids. These were 57·3% for , 57·9% for , and 58·5% for The base compositions of the phage nucleic acids were 45·3–46·7% guanine + cytosine. On the basis of their similar fundamental characteristics these phages may be considered as closely related if not identical.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-39-1-1
1965-04-01
2022-01-21
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/39/1/mic-39-1-1.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-39-1-1&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Adams M. H. 1959 Bacteriophages New York: Interscience Publishers Inc;
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Belozersky A. N., Spirin A. S. 1960; Chemistry of the nucleic acids of microorganisms. In The Nucleic Acids 3147 Chargaff E., Davidson J. N. New York: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Biberstein E. L., Cameron H. S. 1961; The family Brucellaceae in veterinary research. Annu. Rev. Microbiol 15:93
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Blair J. E., Williams R. E. O. 1961; Phage typing of staphylococci. Bull. World Hlth Org 24:771
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Bradley D. E. 1963; The structure of coliphages. J. gen. Microbiol 31:435
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Bradley D. E., Kay D. 1960; The fine structure of bacteriophages. J. gen. Microbiol 23:553
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Brenner S., Horne R. W. 1959; A negative staining method for high resolution electron microscopy of viruses. Biochim. biophys. Ada 34:103
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Calderone J. G., Pickett M. J. 1963; Host range of brucellaphage. Bact. Proc80
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Chargaff E. 1955; Isolation and composition of deoxypentose nucleic acids and of the corresponding nucleoproteins. In The Nucleic Acids 1307 Chargaff E., Davidson J. N. New York: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Cherry W. B., Davis B. R., Edwards P. R., Hogan R. B. 1954; A simple procedure for the identification of the genus Salmonella by means of a specific bacteriophage. J. Lab. clin. Med 44:51
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Drozhevkina M. S. 1951; The phenomenon of bacteriophagia in Brucella cultures and isolation of the first strains of bacteriophages. Zh. Microbiol. Epidemiol. Immunobiol1134 Translation : 1-730-N U.S. Joint Publication Research Service
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Francis E., Evans A. 1926; Agglutination, cross-agglutination, and agglutinin absorption in tularaemia. Publ. Hlth Rep 41:1273
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Gierer A., Schramm G. 1956; Infectivity of ribonucleic acid from tobacco mosaic virus. Nature, Lond 177:702
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Liberman J. D., Pickett M. J. 1952; Hemin requirements of Brucellae. Bact. Proc54
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Mamatsashvili E. G. 1957; Some properties of Brucella bacteriophage. Zh. Microbiol. Epidemiol. Immunobiol 28:1225
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Marmur J. 1961; A procedure for the isolation of deoxyribonucleic acid from microorganisms. J. mol. Biol 3:208
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Marmur J., Doty P. 1962; Determination of the base composition of deoxyribonucleic acid from its thermal denaturation temperature. J. mol. Biol 5:109
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Meyer M. E., Morgan W. J. B. 1962; Metabolic characterization of Brucella strains that show conflicting identity by biochemical serological methods. Bull. World Hlth Org 26:823
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Morgan W. J. B. 1963; The examination of Brucella cultures for lysis by phage. J. gen. Microbiol 30:437
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Parfentjev I. A., Goodline M. A., Viron M. E. 1947; A study of sensitivity to Hemophilus pertussis in laboratory animals. II. Hemophilus pertussis allergen and its assay on laboratory animals. J. Bact 53:603
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Parnas J., Chiozzotto A. 1962; Further studies on Brucella phage morphology. Bull. Acad. polon. Sci 10:135
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Parnas J., Feltynowski A., Bulikowski W. 1958; Anti-Brucella brucei phage. Bull. Acad. polon. Sci 6:201
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Pickett M. J., Calderone J. G. 1963; Criteria for identification of Brucella species. Amer. J. publ. Hlth 53:655
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Pickett M. J., Nelson E. L. 1950; Brucella bacteriophage. J. Hyg., Camb 48:500
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Redmond W. B., Cater J. C., Ward D. M. 1963; Spotting method of phage typing Mycobacteria. Amer. Rev. resp. Dis 87:257
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Sagers R. D. 1962; An efficient, easily constructed cell homogenizing press. Appl. Microbiol 10:37
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Sergienko F. M., Shultz V. M., Natovich A. L. 1940; Bacteriophage against Brucella cultures. Microbiol. Zh. Kiev 7:175
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Seto J. T., Kaesberg P., Wilson J. B. 1956; Electron microscopy and serology of Staphylococcus phages. J. Bact 72:847
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Sjöstrand F. S. 1958; An improved method to prepare formvar nets for mounting thin sections for electron microscopy. Proc. Stockholm Conf. Electron Microscopy 1958120
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Stinebring W. R., Braun W. 1959; Brucellaphage. J. Bact 78:736
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Tokunaga T., Sellers M. I. 1964; Infection of Mycobacterium smegmatis with D29 phage DNA. J. exp. Med 119139
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Topley and Wilson’s Principles of Bacteriology and Immunity 1955, 4. Wilson G. S., Miles A. A. Baltimore: The Williams and Wilkins Co;
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-39-1-1
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-39-1-1
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error