1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Washed suspensions of strain 142, grown on a yeast extract medium, were unable to oxidize some members of the tricarboxylic acid cycle immediately unless these compounds had been added to the growth medium. At 25° the organism eventually acquired the ability to oxidize these compounds; with succinate rapid oxidation was not obtained even after 6 hr. Rapid oxidation of succinate did occur when washed suspensions were incubated first with - or -malate. The lag periods were shortened by the addition of ammonium sulphate, but adaptation was prevented by chloramphenicol, 2:4-dinitrophenol, azide or an increase in temperature to 37°. Neither chloramphenicol nor the increase in temperature affected oxidation by adapted organisms; 2:4-dinitrophenol and azide were inhibitory, especially when added with the substrate. Extracts of unadapted organisms oxidized immediately all those compounds which intact organisms did not. Chloramphenicol and the respiratory uncoupling agents did not inhibit oxidations by the cell extracts. Extracts from adapted or unadapted bacteria reacted with succinate, malate and fumarate in the presence of hydroxylamine to form substances which gave coloured compounds with ferric chloride. The compounds with fumarate and malate were not identified. These compounds and succinhydroxa- mate were formed equally well by extracts of organisms grown in the absence or presence of the dicarboxylic acids. There was no evidence that the enzymes responsible for these reactions are directly concerned with the penetration of the acids into .

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1960-10-01
2021-08-04
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