1887

Abstract

Summary: An investigation has been made of some physiological properties of yeasts from soil and from the leaf surfaces of pasture plants. Almost all the species tested could use cellobiose, and the majority could synthesize growth factors and use a range of organic acids as carbon sources. Some species, including all the pigmented ones examined, could use aromatic compounds as carbon sources. A few species could liquefy gelatin. Only two were able to degrade pectin completely under the conditions used. Almost all could grow within a wide range of hydrogen ion concentrations and at osmotic pressures of at least 30 atmospheres. Ability to survive desiccation varied greatly. Only one species showed any ability to grow at low oxygen tensions. No marked or consistent differences could be seen between soil and leaf yeasts. As both groups are competent to grow in substrates which supply low concentrations of complex foodstuffs, it seems likely that antagonistic factors originating from other members of the soil and leaf populations are responsible for keeping the two floras distinct.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-20-1-13
1959-02-01
2021-08-03
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