1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Freshly isolated and old stock strains of originating from the rumen will produce dextran at 37° in liquid sucrose-containing media. For good yields the presence of CO in some form is necessary. The CO may be provided as HCO3 at the start or during the life of the culture or by incubation in a CO atmosphere. The dextran has [α] +187° to +190° and is similar chemically to the leuco- nostoc dextran save that branching of the αl → 6 linked anhydro-glucose chain is rarer. With some strains practically no dextran is formed in H as gas-phase or in a closed system without HCO3 from which air is excluded. Other strains seem to have a limited power of producing dextran under these conditions, possibly because their action is not entirely homofermentative. Tween 80 will partially replace CO even with the first kind of strain. Highest yields of dextran, up to 80 % of the anhydro- glucose provided, are obtained when the life of the culture is prolonged by repeated neutralization and when additional sucrose is supplied. This is best achieved by the continuous neutralization obtained when solid CaCO is present in the culture. Dextran production is always accompanied by accumulation of fructose in the culture liquid together with a reducing fructose-containing disaccharide. Dextran can sometimes be produced in a simple liquid sucrose + proteose peptone medium with no phosphate buffering. Other things being equal, the presence of CO or HCO3 does not greatly increase the yield of bacterial protein in sucrose media.

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1958-08-01
2021-10-18
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