1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: In mixed cultures where and W were in competition for the same dissolved food, the population size of both species (expressed in terms of total number of organisms), as well as the size and shape of individual organisms, were all affected by the presence of the other species. The size of the Chilomonas population was significantly larger in mixed than in single cultures up to the stationary phase, after which the Chilomonas rapidly decreased in numbers and finally died out. The Tetrahymena population was also larger in mixed cultures in the early stages, though by the beginning of the stationary phase this was not so. Only when the Chilomonas had died out did the Tetrahymena population again reach the size of that in single cultures. In terms of total volume of organisms, the growth of the Tetrahymena population was not as good initially as in single cultures. Later, when the Chilomonas population became very small, the total volume of the Tetrahymena population increased and finally reached the size of the population in single cultures.

and were both more slender in mixed than in single cultures, the differences being statistically significant. Variability of the organisms was greater in mixed cultures and changed with the age of the population. During population growth, the individual size of the Chilomonas and the Tetrahymena changed; but the time-course of change was different for the two species. While the size of the Chilomonas increased in the logarithmic phase and then decreased, the size of the Tetrahymena decreased in the logarithmic phase and increased in the phase of negative growth acceleration. In old cultures, the size of both species was smaller than at the beginning of the stationary phase.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-16-3-561
1957-06-01
2022-07-01
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/16/3/mic-16-3-561.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-16-3-561&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Corliss J. O. 1952; Comparative studies on holotrichous ciliates in the Colpidium-Glaucoma-Leucophrys-Tetrahymena Group I. General consideration and history of strains in pure culture. Trans. Amer. micr. Soc 71:159
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Corliss J. O. 1953a; Comparative studies on holotrichous ciliates in the Colpidium-Glaucoma-Leucophrys-Tetrahymena Group II. Morphology, life cycles and systematic status of strains in pure culture. Parasitology 43:49
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Corliss J. O. 1953b; Silver impregnation of ciliated protozoa by the Chatton-Lwoff technique. Stain Tech 28:97
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Crombie A. C. 1945; On competition between different species of graminivorous insects. Proc. Roy. Soc. B 132:362
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Fisher R. A. 1950 Statistical Methods for Research Workers, 11th ed. Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd;
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Gause G. F. 1932; Experimental studies on the struggle for existence. 1. Mixed population of two species of yeast. J. exp. Biol 9:389
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Gause G. F. 1934 The Struggle for Existence p. 163 Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins Co;
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Gause G. F. 1935a; Vérifications expérimentales de la théorie mathématique de la lutte pour la vie. Actualites sci. industr 277:ix–62
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Gause G. F. 1935b; Experimentelle Untersuchungen über die Konkurrenz zwischen Paramecium caudatum und Paramecium aurelia . Arch. Protistenk 84:207
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Hall R. P. 1950; Phytoflagellates as a source of food for Tetrahymena . Proc. Amer. Soc. Protozool 1:5
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Harding J. P. 1937; Quantitative studies on the ciliate Glaucoma. II. The effects of starvation. J. exp. Biol 14:431
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Hutchinson G. E. 1941; Ecological aspects of succession in natural populations. Amer. Nat 75:406
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Huxley J. S. 1942 Evolution: The Modern Synthesis pp. 119–120 London: Allen and Unwin;
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Jahn T. L. 1936; Effect of aeration and lack of CO2 on growth of bacteria-free cultures of Protozoa. Proc. Soc. exp. Biol., N.Y 33:494
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Loefer J. B. 1952; Some observations on the size of Tetrahymena . J. Morph 90:407
    [Google Scholar]
  16. McVeigh I., Brown W. H. 1954; In vitro growth of Chlamydomonas chlamydogama Bold and Haematococcus pluvialis Flotow em. Wille in mixed cultures. Bull. Torrey. hot. Cl 81:218
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Mučibabić S. 1956; Some aspects of the growth of single and mixed populations of flagellates and ciliates. Effect of different temperatures on the population growth of Chilomonas paramecium . J. exp. Biol 33:627
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Ormsbee R. A. 1942; The normal growth and respiration of Tetrahymena geleii . Biol. Bull., Woods Hole 82:423
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Pace D. M., Ireland R. L. 1945; The effects of oxygen, carbon dioxide and pressure on growth in Chilomonas paramecium and Tetrahymena geleii Furgason. J. gen. Physiol 28:547
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Salt G. 1932; The natural control of the sheep blow fly, Lucilia sericata Meigen. Bull. ent. Res 23:235
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Slater J. V., Elliott A. M. 1951; Volume change in Tetrahymena in relation to age of the culture. Proc. Amer. Soc. Protozool 2:20
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Weis D. 1954; Observations on size reversibility in cultures of Tetrahymena pyriformis (abstr.). J. Protozool 1: Suppl 10
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-16-3-561
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-16-3-561
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error