1887

Abstract

subsp. , a Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacterium, secretes an extracellular metalloprotease, PrtW. Previous results demonstrated that protease activity is necessary for the normal progression of disease symptoms caused by this bacterium. The present study revealed that the gene constitutes an independent transcriptional unit. It is demonstrated that introduction of the plasmid into the mutant restores the protease activity in this strain. Gene fusions to the (β-glucuronidase) reporter were employed to analyse the transcription of . The transcription of is dependent on many environmental signals. When the bacteria were grown in the presence of potato extract, the expression of the protease gene was markedly higher at the beginning of the exponential phase of growth than that observed when cells were grown in the presence of polygalacturonate (PGA). Analysis of the promoter revealed that an essential regulatory region resided between 371 and 245 bp 5′ of the translational start site. As this sequence showed no homology to the KdgR box it may be involved in the binding of an unknown negative regulator protein in subsp. . The differential responses of expression to potato extract and to PGA appeared to be dependent on the KdgR repressor and the response regulator ExpA. According to the results presented here, it is conceivable that the multiple regulatory network allows flexibility in the expression of the gene during different stages of infection.

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2002-03-01
2021-10-16
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