1887

Abstract

The mycolic acids of several strains of were examined by chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. Both HPLC and TLC revealed two patterns of mycolates among the strains studied. As determined by TLC, one pattern was composed of α-, methoxy- and keto-mycolates; the other was composed of these mycolates plus an additional component, which was identified as dicarboxy-mycolates. The dicarboxy-mycolates were only found in those strains that displayed a so-called HPLC-double-cluster pattern. Detailed structural analyses of the dicarboxy-mycolates indicated that these compounds contained predominantly 61–65 carbon atoms (C was the major component) and a 1,2-disubstituted cyclopropane ring. Thus, the dicarboxy-mycolate content of strains of determines their HPLC pattern. In spite of the differences in their HPLC patterns, and although they belonged to different PCR-restriction length polymorphism clusters, all of the strains examined in this study were closely related on the basis of the structural features of their α-, keto- and methoxy-mycolates; the predominant α-mycolates contained two -1,2-disubstituted cyclopropane rings, the major keto-mycolates contained a -1,2-disubstituted cyclopropane ring and the methoxy-mycolates contained one - or one -1,2-disubstituted cyclopropane ring. It is noteworthy that the strains containing dicarboxy-mycolates also displayed significant amounts of α-mycolates that contained one -1,2-disubstituted cyclopropane ring and one double bond. The results obtained in this study demonstrate heterogeneity among strains.

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2002-10-01
2020-04-02
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