1887

Abstract

The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) is widely found among Gram-positive bacteria. It is the major source of carbohydrate transport in the dental pathogen . The transported carbohydrates are fermented to produce large amounts of lactic acid which initiates dental caries. The authors have isolated the gene for the mannitol-specific Enzyme II (EII) component of the PTS, , and the adjacent gene, which is located in the same operon. The gene is located between and the genes and . The nucleotide sequence of the and loci has been determined. The deduced gene product of consists of 589 amino acids with a molecular mass of 620 kDa. It exhibits similarity with the gene products from other organisms. However, the similarity between these proteins is generally restricted to the 470 amino-terminal residues of the protein. This region would correspond to the EIICB domains of the PTS. The authors have previously shown that the gene product exhibits 766% similarity to the carboxyl-terminal 143 amino acids of the product and that the gene encodes the EIIA domain of the PTS. Thus, the genes that encode the EIICB and the EIIA domains are separated by approximately 2250 bp. In many organisms, all of the EII domains may be fused together to form one molecule. The fact that these domains are separated by this distance in supports the hypothesis that various functional domains of the PTS have been rearranged during evolution. The sequence of the 119 carboxyl-terminal amino acids of the gene product also displays homology to the carboxyl-terminal end of the EIIB domain of various mannitol PTSs. Thus, this domain may have been duplicated in during evolution of the operon. The gene is located in the same operon structure as but these loci are separated by an intragenic space. The precise 5′ end of the locus cannot be determined either by transcription–translation assays or based upon nucleotide sequence analysis because of the apparent lack of a ribosome-binding site preceding the gene. The deduced gene product, which consists of approximately 650 amino acids with a molecular mass of 753 kDa, exhibits limited similarity to several potential transcriptional regulators. However, the exact function of this locus is currently unknown.

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2000-07-01
2020-01-24
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