1887

Abstract

Analysis of bud-site selection in the yeast has helped to identify many genes that are generally important for eukaryotic cell polarization. Colony morphology screens were used to identify factors relevant to the process of bipolar budding in yeast. Mutants defective in bipolar budding were identified by virtue of their inability to grow as pseudohyphae in a haploid background. A mutant allele of the gene, encoding a class-V unconventional myosin was identified that perturbs bipolar budding without affecting axial budding and without grossly affecting the role of Myo2p in secretion and maintenance of the actin cytoskeleton. Several genes were also identified whose products, when overexpressed, are capable of disrupting bipolar budding. Among these are the actin-monomer-binding protein profilin and the Aip3p/Bud6p-interacting protein Atc1p. The results strongly support involvement of the actin cytoskeleton in the establishment of bipolar budding and in the maintenance of pseudohyphal growth.

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2000-11-01
2020-01-26
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