1887

Abstract

Summary: The expression of a glucose-regulated gene () changes significantly during the vegetative life cycle of the amounts of mRNA are low in dormant conidia, increase during germination and exponential growth, decline in young aerial hyphae and reach a maximum in late (15-18 h) aerial hyphae. Heat shock (30 min at 45°C) elevated the mRNA level of this gene especially in early aerial hyphae, whereas no increase above the high constitutive amount was found after heat treatment of late aerial hyphae. The expression of the inducible gene after heat shock also varied with the state of development and showed the highest inducibility in late aerial hyphae. Surface mycelium, from which aerial hyphae emerge, showed a similar increase in the amounts of both mRNA species. A developmental mutant (), which is defective in minor constriction budding of aerial hyphae, showed lower levels of mRNA as well as of and mRNA (after heat shock) in late aerial hyphae. The mutant did not form conidia at this stage. It is concluded that the high constitutive and inducible expression of stress genes in late aerial hyphae is due to a developmental activation of their transcription or, alternatively, to a lower degradation rate of their mRNA during this stage.

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1998-01-01
2021-10-25
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